Do Washington and Beijing Offer Alternative World Orders?

Between Integration and Coexistence: US-Chinese Strategies of International Order
Liselotte Odgaard
Strategic Studies Quarterly
Spring 2013

The past five years have witnessed much debate as to whether a world order dominated by liberal internationalists institutions (UN, WTA, World Bank, IMF, etc) has reached the end of its era, and whether perhaps the time has arrived for the rise of a new international order that finds its inspiration in China. The rise of the Chinese economy, the nation’s growing assertiveness in international affairs, and its readiness to interpret international agreements to suit its own purposes makes that question real. Is China happy to run rampant across an established world order, or does it sincerely propose to offer a unique international order of its own?

In an article in the just-released edition of Strategic Studies Quarterly, Danish security strategist Dr. Liselotte Odgaard notes that China and America have espoused two visions of the way the world should work, but she suggests that they are incompatible. Why? Because both are based on domestic ideologies that appear to prevent either side coming to a practical accommodation. The real challenge is whether either of these approaches will garner international support. Odgaard takes a bold step by suggesting which side she thinks will prevail and why.

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2 thoughts on “Do Washington and Beijing Offer Alternative World Orders?

  1. Reblogged this on fatwise and commented:
    In a 2007 presentation titled “China’s Rise and its Global Political Implications” that I held in the context of my diploma studies I set forth various hypotheses, willfully phrased in a bold and possibly exaggerated fashion, thereunder “China’s growing capacity will be used to exclude America from Asia” and “2020 we’ll live in a unipolar world – with China as sole superpower”.

    In her paper “Between Integration and Coexistence: US-Chinese Strategies of International Order”, Danish security strategist Dr. Liselotte Odgaard argues that these hypotheses are unlikely to come true.

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